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10th Sunday of the Year B 

Today’s Readings

10th Sunday of the Year B

Mark 3:20-35

One thing Jesus never does is sugar coat evil.

He calls it what it is, faces it head on and destroys it
in the sacrifice of His Flesh and Blood.

How different our popular culture treats the Evil One,
they make light of him, treating him like a cartoon character

or a Hollywood hero.

Evil is real.

 

It’s not what our world makes it out to be:
the effects of people’s errors; prejudice or some personal dysfunctions.

“When we see the frenzy of a violent mob,
The vicious and wanton slaughter
that military combat inflicts on the innocent,
The lack of any concern the illegal drug industry
inflicts on so many of our young people
destroying their lives forever
so they can escape reality for a moment or two;

The demonic power of pornography that destroys family relationships
and changes even the chemistry of our minds and thus our bodies;

These and many other evils give us a new respect
for the Gospel account we hear today.

 

As St Paul knew so well,
“Our battle is not only with flesh and blood
but with principalities and powers
that seek the destruction of ourselves and everything good.”

Jesus doesn’t sugar coat, he confronts evil with his Passion,
invading the house under Satan’s control,
showing that the hold of evil is neither complete nor final,
even though it might seem that way to us.

My friends, be very much aware however bleak
and how much the culture and world may seem
to be going down the tubes –
our desire to be in communion with God
means that the hold of evil is not competed.

 

Our effort to protect life at all of its stages
means that the hold of evil is not complete.

The struggle of a spouse to remain faithful
means that the hold of evil is not complete.

Our battle with the Evil One is not just a historical drama
but a fact of every human life.

 

No human being is immune to this ambush of evil every day.

There is no furlough granted,
and no one ever gets to retire from evil in this life.

Jesus gives us himself in every Sacrament we celebrate
to battle the evil that surrounds us.

 

St Paul in the second reading suggests
that our inner self can be renewed and made strong by Christ.

There are burdens of suffering
we have to endure at times, but we have hope.

It’s not going to be like this forever.

 

Our sufferings make us dig down deep inside when,
like Jesus we face them, using the strength he had on the cross
to remain faithful and true to us.

 

The Mass, being with Jesus on the Cross
and at the Empty Tomb is our strength.

It is our supply depot, our arsenal to keep evil at bay.

More than that, we receive strength to go on the offense,
to leave the comfort of our foxhole
and push back the line of evil, attacking us, our families and communities.

This celebration is our assurance of final victory.

 

In the meantime, my friends, please remember,
our soul is still undecided.

We have to choose to be with Jesus every day.

It’s not what our world makes it out to be:
the effects of people’s errors; prejudice or some personal dysfunctions.

“When we see the frenzy of a violent mob,
The vicious and wanton slaughter
that military combat inflicts on the innocent,

The lack of any concern the illegal drug industry
inflicts on so many of our young people
destroying their lives forever
so they can escape reality for a moment or two;

The demonic power of pornography that destroys family relationships
and changes even the chemistry of our minds and thus our bodies;

These and many other evils give us a new respect
for the Gospel account we hear today.

 

As St Paul knew so well,
“Our battle is not only with flesh and blood
but with principalities and powers
that seek the destruction of ourselves and everything good.”

Jesus doesn’t sugar coat, he confronts evil with his Passion,
invading the house under Satan’s control,
showing that the hold of evil is neither complete nor final,
even though it might seem that way to us.

My friends, be very much aware however bleak
and how much the culture and world may seem
to be going down the tubes –
our desire to be in communion with God
means that the hold of evil is not competed.

Our effort to protect life at all of its stages
that the hold of evil is not complete.

The struggle of a spouse to remain faithful
means that the hold of evil is not complete.

 

Our battle with the Evil One is not just a historical drama
but a fact of every human life.

No human being is immune to this ambush of evil every day.

There is no furlough granted,
and no one ever gets to retire from evil in this life.

 

Jesus gives us himself in every Sacrament we celebrate
to battle the evil that surrounds us.

St Paul in the second reading suggests
that our inner self can be renewed and made strong by Christ.

There are burdens of suffering
we have to endure at times, but we have hope.

 

It’s not going to be like this forever.

Our sufferings make us dig down deep inside when,
like Jesus we face them, using the strength he had on the cross
to remain faithful and true to us.

The Mass, being with Jesus on the Cross
and at the Empty Tomb is our strength.

It is our supply depot, our arsenal to keep evil at bay.

More than that, we receive strength to go on the offense,
to leave the comfort of our foxhole
and push back the line of evil, attacking us, our families and communities.

This celebration is our assurance of final victory.

 

In the meantime, my friends, please remember,
our soul is still undecided.

We have to choose to be with Jesus every day.

Resource:
Joseph Kemp, Captured Fire

Rick Pilger

Father Pilger, I.C. was born in Canton, Illinois and was ordained at St. John’s Seminary, Wonersh, England in December 1978. He joined the Blessed Sacrament Parish in August 1995, coming here from Sacred Heart Parish in Bradenton Florida. After 22 years as Parochial Vicar, he was appointed Pastor by Bishop Gregory Parkes in June 20, 2017.

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